geo-resources
Geo-resources for the future
a Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minor

Geo-resources are used everywhere in our daily life, it’s not just the petrol that drives our cars and busses and the gas that warms our houses. Geo-resources are also needed to make sustainable energy sources. In this Minor, you will learn about the various disciplines that are involved in a responsible exploitation and trading of geo-resources and practice their integration. 

The joint Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors are multidisciplinary and open to all students of Leiden University, TU Delft and Erasmus University Rotterdam.

havenIn order to tackle complex resource challenges such as limited availability or political volatility, various viewpoints have to be considered. In this Minor, you will learn about the various disciplines that are involved in the responsible exploitation and trading of geo-resources and practice their integration. 

We are facing challenges: Increasing CO2 emissions are causing climate change and call for an energy transition towards renewable energy sources. In addition, the supplies of fossil fuels and minerals are limited and their availability and prices strongly depend on global politics. In order to tackle this complex societal challenge, various viewpoints have to be considered.

In this Minor, you will learn about the various disciplines that are involved in a responsible exploitation and trading of geo-resources and practice their integration. You will work on economic, environmental and social aspects that are needed to achieve a ‘licence to operate’. How is it done today and what do we need to change tomorrow? 

Take a look at the courses of this minor programme

Reasons to choose a Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minor:

LDE1. Joint education by three top-class universities.
2. Important societal challenges and new solutions.
3. Educators and students from different academic fields.
4. Cases by companies, governments and NGOs.
5. Expand your network in Leiden, Den Haag, Delft and Rotterdam.

More Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors

What are the key features of the multidisciplinary Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors?

  • Admission requirements: Most Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors are open to all students of Leiden University, TU Delft and Erasmus University Rotterdam. A small number also require prior knowledge or involve a selection process.
  • Number of places: Although it varies according to the minor, between 40 and 90 students can participate (see the link below for numbers for each minor). A number of places are reserved for each university in order to ensure a balanced distribution from the different programmes.
  • Language: All Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors are taught in English.
  • Credits: All minors have a coherent program of 30 EC. It is possible to only follow the first block of 15 EC.
  • Location: The lectures and seminars are held in one or more of the following cities: Leiden, Delft, The Hague, Rotterdam. 
  • Applications: You apply for a Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minor via your own university.
  • Selection: Some Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors are selection minors, which means you will need to write a motivation letter. Make sure you check the application date.
  • Courses: The course descriptions can be found in the prospectus of the coordinating university. 

Take a look at the courses of this minor programme in the prospectus of the coordinating university


Student and lecturers about this minor 

Basil Hammer – Bachelor in International Studies at Leiden University: 'I think it is important to know more about the supply chain of resources, especially in relation to politics. Having a good understanding of the extraction of geo-resources puts you in a much better position for making future policy decisions. 

'The content of the course itself was not very technical; I found it very manageable. Usually, I’m surrounded by humanities students, so it was refreshing to be surrounded by engineers for once – so much of our modern world is built by people with a background in technology and engineering.'  Read more about student experiences

velislava vasilevaVelislava Vasileva – Bachelor in International Studies at Leiden University: 'The topics in this programme, such as the value chain of resources, but also the political economy, are therefore very relevant to me. What also appealed to me was the fact that the minor is a collaboration between three different universities. This looks nice on my CV of course as all of these universities have a great reputation.'

'Our field trip was really cool. We went on a boat trip in the port of Rotterdam. It was impressive to see all those big ships in real life. One of the modules of the programme was about the political economy of geo-resources. That’s why it was valuable to see their transportation and storage in action. '  Read more about student experiences

“This minor focuses on the resources and metals that we will need in the future' says René Kleijn, Associate Professor in the Department of Industrial Ecology at Leiden University. The energy transition plays a major role within the minor because it has far-reaching consequences for the demand for resources. 'The energy transition is also a switch from fossil fuels to metals,' he explains. 'We are moving towards a society that uses a lot more electricity, and that technology is largely based on metals. Just imagine all the batteries, wind turbines, and solar cells.'

Kleijn emphasises that the minor deals with geo-resources as broadly as possible: 'Society as a whole is going to change drastically. That requires new business cases, different regulations, and political decisiveness. It is important that students develop a good understanding of what is involved in the supply chain of resources and that they understand what we might expect in the future.' Read more about this minor in the interview with Dr Rene Kleijn

phil vardonDr. Phil Vardon, lecturer in Geo-Engineering, TU Delft: 'Large-scale infrastructural developments and large projects require engineers who can take non-technical aspects into account, as well as other team members who have an eye for the technical side. And there are still too few of them. This minor fills this gap and – very importantly – brings students into contact with each other.'