smart cities
Smart and SHARED Cities
A multidisciplinary Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minor

Smart City is a buzz word. Technological developments bring opportunities for the city, but also social discussion. How do citizens and administrators deal with the digitization of the city? What questions arise with developments such as WiFi trackers, CCTV, smart lampposts, delivery robots and drones in public space? This raises not only technical, but also legal, economic and behavioral science questions. Interested? Join the Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minor Smart and SHARED Cities.

The joint Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors are multidisciplinary and open to all students of Leiden University, TU Delft and Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Jonathan van Rijn
Photo: Jonathan van Rijn

This minor is built on a combination of data, urban, political and social sciences. This multidisciplinary minor is open to all students who are interested in the development of smart and shared cities. The aim of the minor is to introduce students through case-based education to the different smart city concepts and the underlying complexity of modern cities, focused on urban technologies and data science with citizen experience and multi-stakeholder governance.

The program is characterized by a multi-disciplinary approach, which allows students to take different perspectives and understand the complexity of smart city life. The program intends to stimulate a reflective mindset, focusing on the interrelation of problems and responsible innovation. The learning goals concern knowledge, attitude and skills which in combination need to equip students with a critical mindset that enables them to work towards public needs and interests in smart cities.

The concept in which you learn to think abut smart cities is the SHARED-model: Sustainable, Harmonious, Affective, Relevant, Empowering, Diverse. This is developed by the Leiden-Delft-Erasmus Centre for BOLD Cities, also the founding group of this minor  Read more about the Centre for BOLD Cities

Take a look at the courses of this minor programme

Reasons to choose a Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minor:

LDE1. Joint education programmes provided by three top universities.
2. Urgent social issues and new potential solutions.
3. Lecturers and students from a range of specialisms.
4. Case studies from businesses, government authorities and NGOs.
5. A network in Leiden, The Hague, Delft and Rotterdam.

More Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors

What are the key features of the multidisciplinary Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors?

  • Admission requirements: Most Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors are open to all students of Leiden University, TU Delft and Erasmus University Rotterdam. A small number also require prior knowledge or involve a selection process.
  • Number of places: Although it varies according to the minor, between 40 and 90 students can participate (see the link below for numbers for each minor). A number of places are reserved for each university in order to ensure a balanced distribution from the different programmes.
  • Language: All Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors are taught in English.
  • Credits: All minors have a coherent program of 30 EC. It is possible to only follow the first block of 15 EC.
  • Location: The lectures and seminars are held in one or more of the following cities: Leiden, Delft, The Hague, Rotterdam. 
  • Applications: You apply for a Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minor via your own university.
  • Selection: Some Leiden-Delft-Erasmus minors are selection minors, which means you will need to write a motivation letter. Make sure you check the application date.
  • Courses: The course descriptions can be found in the prospectus of the coordinating university. 

Take a look at the courses of this minor programme in the prospectus of the coordinating university

Students and lecturers about this minor

Huyen Vu - Student Management of International Social Challenges, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam

huyenI have a strong interest in anything related to innovation, such as big data and cyber security. When I found out about the minor ‘Smart and Shared Cities’ I immediately had this gut feeling that I had to subscribe. The minor touches upon current developments, such as the increasing amount of data and how to use this information in a smart way. Not just on a theoretical level as we also looked at applications in cities.

   'Social studies are important for the academic embedding of the project, but also the idea framing. I noticed the people from Delft are very creative in presenting results.'

I really liked the combination of the three universities. Not only did I meet a lot of different people with various backgrounds, but also everybody brought different skills. The people from TU Delft for example brought more hard skills related to technology, while the students from Leiden and Erasmus have backgrounds in business or public administration. Social studies are important for the academic embedding of the project, but also the idea framing. I noticed the people from Delft are very creative in presenting results. A girl in my group made a nice video about our project. I think we complimented each other very well.”  Read more

patrykPatryk Jarmakowicz - Student Management of International Social Challenges, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam - Followed the 15 ECT option of the minor

For me, the minor ‘Smart and Shared Cities’ was already my second minor. I didn’t need the credits, so that’s why my idea was to only finish the program if I really liked it. I ended up finding it very interesting and refreshing. The teaching methods were different from my program as it is highly interactive. The assignments are always based on what we learned during the lectures. I didn’t have to do a single exam and this was completely new to me.

   'You work together with students who have completely different backgrounds. This also means we all tend to approach things differently.'

The design project especially stood out for me. We were working on different concepts in order to make mobility more accessible in Helmond, which is part of Brainport Eindhoven. The design process felt really creative. You work together with students who have completely different backgrounds. This also means we all tend to approach things differently. In my group, I had an architecture student from Delft. Whenever I would come up with an idea he would say “Patrick, give me the Ipad” and in the blink of an eye, he would sketch it on a mirror board. It was nice to see how architecture students work and to learn from them at the same time.'  Read more

klievinkProf.dr. Bram Klievink, professor of Public Administration and focussed on digitization and public policy at Leiden University, is affiliated with the minor. He explains that the development of the minor Smart and SHARED Cities will create a real community between the three LDE universities, one in which administrative and technological developments in cities will be discussed side by side. 

The minor highlights technology in an urban context from various disciplines. Despite the differences across the areas of expertise, Klievink still finds it easy to interact with different experts: 'A collaboration like this forces us to give all perspectives a place, not only within the program but also generally in relation to each other. This creates a close bond, consciously and unconsciously, because we share the same interests.'  Read more